Britain World War Two Statistics
Britain had 357,116 killed in the war
Seven in Ten Young Men, One in Nine Young Women, Served in Forces
                                                        (June 1946)

Altogether 357,116 people of Britain were killed in the war - 264,443 in the armed forces, 60,595 civilians, 30,248 in the
Merchant Navy and Fishing Fleets, 1,206 in the Home Guard and 624 in the Women's Auxiliary Services.

Detailed statistics given in a White Paper (Cmd. 6832, price 2d.) issued yesterday show that the number killed is about
one-third of that of the 1914-18 war. Those killed in the Services were:

Navy......................................50,758
Army....................................144,079
R.A.F.....................................69,606

Of the civilians who died from enemy action 26,923 were men, 25,399 were women, and 7,736 were children under 16. There
were also 537 unidentified bodies. At one time 46,079 men were "missing" but so many rejoined their units that the figure is
now only 6,244 and even that will be subject to later correction.

The wounded total 369,267, comprising: Armed Forces, 277,077 (Army, 239,575; Navy, 14,663; R.A.F., 22,839); civilians,
86,182; Merchant Navy and fishing fleet, 4,707; women's auxiliary services, 744; Home Guard, 557.

Three out of five men born between 1905 and 1927, and seven out of every ten men born between 1915 and 1927 served in the
armed forces. One in every nine women born between 1915 and 1927 served.


The peak of mobilisation was reached in June, 1944, when 8,881,000 - 7,963,000 men and 918,000 women - were serving
either full time or part time in the armed forces or other services.

In the armed forces 90,332 casualties, including 29,968 killed, were suffered in the war against Japan.